Planet Earth

There are 9 item(s) tagged with the keyword "Archaeology".

Displaying: 1 - 9 of 9

1. Podcast: What our ancestors ate

This week in the Planet Earth podcast, Sophy Charlton and Oliver Craig of the University of York talk about the work they're doing to find out about our ancestors' favourite foods six thousand years ago.

Tags: Archaeology, Food, Marine life, Podcasts, UK
2. Isotopes reveal the diet of a king

Richard III enjoyed a life of luxury during the brief period between becoming king and perishing at the Battle of Bosworth, an analysis of the chemical composition of his bones and teeth has shown.

Tags: Archaeology, UK
3. Did humans transport Stonehenge rocks further than previously thought?

Scientists have pinpointed the exact source of many of the rocks used to build Stonehenge.

Tags: Archaeology, Geology, UK
4. Prehistoric mummy puzzle

Mummified bodies made of chopped up people? It's not a legend from ancient Egypt but a find from the Outer Hebrides. Tamera Jones finds out how the latest forensic techniques were applied to the mystery of Britain's first prehistoric mummies.

Tags: Archaeology
5. No stone unturned

Local geology gives historic towns and buildings their unique character, but just as buildings fall into disrepair many local quarries have been lost too. English Heritage and the British Geological Survey teamed up to help protect this overlooked resource.

Tags: Archaeology, Conservation, Geology, Natural resources, Sustainability
6. Podcast: Neanderthal mammoth hunters in Jersey

This week in the Planet Earth Podcast, Richard Hollingham meets scientists and archaeologists who are working to preserve one of the most important Neanderthal settlements in north-west Europe to find out how they lived.

Tags: Archaeology, Environmental change, Palaeontology, Podcasts
7. Archaeologists find Britain's oldest house

Remains discovered in North Yorkshire are the oldest house ever found in the UK, according to researchers.

Tags: Archaeology, Environmental change
8. Footprint evidence for early occupation of the Americas refuted

Identifying human footprints correctly is vital for understanding when man first occupied different parts of the world.

Tags: Archaeology
9. Out of Asia - The spread of agriculture

Agriculture spread from Asia into Europe in a 'stop-go' process, say Glynis Jones, Caitlin Buck, Mike Charles, Tom Higham and Sue Colledge.

Tags: Archaeology, Environmental change, Geology

Displaying: 1 - 9 of 9